Fired dating subordinate

This issue can sometimes fall into a gray area, but the answer is probably yes, your employer can restrict you from moonlighting, whether through its personnel policy or by requiring that you sign a non-compete agreement that limits the type of work you can do for anyone other than your current employer.Most states do not have laws protecting your right to work for another employer, and in the absence of any legal protection, you are most likely employed at will, meaning you can be terminated at any time for any reason.Generally, an employer can fire you for having a personal website or blog that it deems inappropriate, with very limited exceptions.Even if you have a non-work related website that you don't access from your office, employers can fire you if they feel the content on your personal site or blog is offensive to them or to potential clients, or reflects badly on the company.While generally these policies are designed to prevent you from dating someone in your chain-of-command, be sure that you do not violate your company's policy, which may be more strict than the most common policies.Some companies now ask that you notify the company before dating a coworker, and may require that you sign a "relationship contract," indicating that the relationship is voluntary and consensual.

This page provides answers to many common questions about off-duty conduct, but for issues with off-duty conduct it is always advisable to have a local attorney look at your case. I recently came out as gay and when my employer found out I was fired. It depends on the activity involved, and whether that activity has any legal protection under your state's laws.If, however, they say no, then you will have to make a decision about whether you can continue in your current employment, which is always easier to make before you are terminated for violating company policy.If your company does not have a moonlighting policy, then it may not be a problem for you to have a second job, but to be safe, you might want to consult a supervisor or your company's HR department.For more information on these laws, see our site's page on political activity retaliation.) If it is essential for you to moonlight for financial reasons, or you are gaining experience which might help you advance within your current company, then you may wish to talk to your supervisor or someone in your company's human resources department to find out the reason behind the company's policy, and to see whether your employer is willing to make an exception to the policy.If they understand that your primary loyalty is to your full-time job, and respect the reasoning behind your need to moonlight, then you will have resolved this issue in a way that doesn't risk your full-time employment.